All posts by arnoldwlytivlhol

psychic readings 16

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nWht5hrLFO0

Advertisements

Trump rages as Clinton helps recount

10_donald_trump_2_ap_1160.jpg

“This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing,” Donald Trump said. | AP Photo

Clinton campaign says it will have a presence in the Wisconsin process.

By Brent Griffiths

11/26/16 12:25 PM EST

Updated 11/26/16 05:13 PM EST

Just when you thought it was over, the acrimonious presidential race is back.

Nearly three weeks after Election Day, the Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigns went back into battle mode Saturday in the wake of Wisconsins pending recount.

Story Continued Below

After a period of public silence about the results of the 2016 election, Clinton’s top campaign lawyer said the campaign will play a role in the recount initiated Friday by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. It will follow the same approach in Michigan and Pennsylvania if the third-party hopeful pursues recounts in those states as she has indicated.

“Because we had not uncovered any actionable evidence of hacking or outside attempts to alter the voting technology, we had not planned to exercise this option ourselves, but now that a recount has been initiated in Wisconsin, we intend to participate in order to ensure the process proceeds in a manner that is fair to all sides,” Marc Elias, Clinton’s general counsel, wrote Saturday on Medium.

Trump delivered a measured response measured by his standards attacking Stein directly but refraining from criticizing Clinton.

10_donald_trump_21_gty_1160.jpg

This recount is just a way for Jill Stein, who received less than one percent of the vote overall and wasnt even on the ballot in many states, to fill her coffers with money, most of which she will never even spend on this ridiculous recount, Trump said in a statement released by his transition team. “This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing.”

In his only mention of Clinton, the president-elect — who frequently raised questions during the campaign about voter fraud and the prospect that the election process would be rigged against him — reminded that the Democratic nominee had already conceded.

The people have spoken and the election is over, and as Hillary Clinton herself said on election night, in addition to her conceding by congratulating me, ‘We must accept this result and then look to the future,’ he said.

Later Saturday, he tweeted: “The Green Party scam to fill up their coffers by asking for impossible recounts is now being joined by the badly defeated & demoralized Dems”

Kellyanne Conway, Trumps campaign manager, had a sharper edge to her response to the news that the Clinton campaign would join in the Wisconsin recount process.

“What a pack of sore losers. After asking Mr. Trump and his team a million times on the trail, ‘Will HE accept the election results?’ it turns out Team Hillary and her new BFF Jill Stein can’t accept reality,” Conway said in a statement to Bloomberg. “Rather than adhere to the tradition of graciously conceding and wishing the winner well, they’ve opted to waste millions of dollars and dismiss the democratic process. The people have spoken. Time to listen up. #YesYourPresident.”

Stein filed for a recount just before Wisconsin’s 5 p.m. deadline on Friday. She originally promised supporters that if she raised $2.5 million, then the campaign would also file for similar action in Michigan and Pennsylvania.

But based on Donald Trump’s current standing in the Electoral College, Clinton would have to win all three states to overturn the election results.

Elias, the Clinton campaign lawyer, said that participating in the recount was the right step to ensure a fair outcome for all sides but was careful not to get Clinton supporters hopes up too high.

Acknowledging “the heartbreak felt by so many who worked so hard to elect Hillary Clinton,” Elias emphasized that Clinton allies had combed through data and queried experts since President-elect Donald Trump’s upset victory. But it had not found evidence of any hacking of actual votes, and Elias a veteran of many recount fights conceded that Clinton’s deficit even in the closest state, Michigan, “exceeds the largest margin ever overcome in a recount.”

“Regardless of the potential to change the outcome in any of the states, we feel it is important, on principle, to ensure our campaign is legally represented in any court proceedings and represented on the ground in order to monitor the recount process itself,” wrote Elias.

Stein used the opportunity to needle Clinton.

“Why would Hillary Clintonwho conceded the election to Donald Trumpwant #Recount2016? You cannot be on-again, off-again about democracy,” she said in a tweet.

Speculation about potential hacking of several states’ results reached a fever pitch before the holiday weekend, after a New York magazine cited an effort by cyber security experts to convince the Clinton camp that they had found “persuasive evidence” that results in the three states may have been “manipulated or hacked.

On Wednesday, however, J. Alex Halderman of the University of Michigan one of the experts clarified in a Medium post that he was not claiming to have evidence of a hack, but that he still recommends a full audit beyond the partial ones that are likely to occur anyway.

Other accounts also knocked down the idea that electronic voting machines had been tampered with.

The Obama administration said it has seen no evidence of hackers tampering with the presidential election results.

We stand behind our election results, which accurately reflect the will of the American people, a senior administration official told POLITICO late Friday.

The federal government did not observe any increased level of malicious cyber activity aimed at disrupting our electoral process on election day, the official added. We believe our elections were free and fair from a cybersecurity perspective.

In Wisconsin, Trumps margin of victory is just over 22,000 votes.

161126-Barack-Obama-AP_16325844478347.jpg

According to a Friday statement from Michael Haas, an administrator for Wisconsin Election Commission, the recount will begin late next week after the Stein campaign has paid the recount fee. “The state is working under a federal deadline of December 13 to complete the recount,” said the statement. “As a result, county boards of canvassers may need to work evenings and weekends to meet the deadlines.”

Official results from Wisconsin’s 72 counties indicate that 2.975 million votes were cast in the state Trump won 1.404 million votes to Clinton’s 1.382 million.

Clinton leads the president-elect by 2.2 million votes in the popular vote, as of Saturday morning. The former secretary of state has garnered 64,637,140 votes nationally, compared to Trumps 62,408,908, according to a count curated by Dave Wasserman of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.

Some Democrats have argued that Clintons large lead in the popular vote should serve as the impetus for reforming or eliminating the Electoral College system. Several anti-Trump electors have led a longshot effort to convince GOP electors to defect from the president-elect, and an attorney working with them said hes preparing to file suit within two weeks on behalf of Micheal Baca, a Democratic elector from Colorado.

That effort would be part of a coordinated legal fight to dismantle the 29 state laws that force electors to support their partys nominees one of the greatest impediments facing so-called faithless electors.

This story tagged under:

Trump rages as Clinton helps recount

10_donald_trump_2_ap_1160.jpg

“This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing,” Donald Trump said. | AP Photo

Clinton campaign says it will have a presence in the Wisconsin process.

By Brent Griffiths

11/26/16 12:25 PM EST

Updated 11/26/16 05:13 PM EST

Just when you thought it was over, the acrimonious presidential race is back.

Nearly three weeks after Election Day, the Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigns went back into battle mode Saturday in the wake of Wisconsins pending recount.

Story Continued Below

After a period of public silence about the results of the 2016 election, Clinton’s top campaign lawyer said the campaign will play a role in the recount initiated Friday by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. It will follow the same approach in Michigan and Pennsylvania if the third-party hopeful pursues recounts in those states as she has indicated.

“Because we had not uncovered any actionable evidence of hacking or outside attempts to alter the voting technology, we had not planned to exercise this option ourselves, but now that a recount has been initiated in Wisconsin, we intend to participate in order to ensure the process proceeds in a manner that is fair to all sides,” Marc Elias, Clinton’s general counsel, wrote Saturday on Medium.

Trump delivered a measured response measured by his standards attacking Stein directly but refraining from criticizing Clinton.

10_donald_trump_21_gty_1160.jpg

This recount is just a way for Jill Stein, who received less than one percent of the vote overall and wasnt even on the ballot in many states, to fill her coffers with money, most of which she will never even spend on this ridiculous recount, Trump said in a statement released by his transition team. “This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing.”

In his only mention of Clinton, the president-elect — who frequently raised questions during the campaign about voter fraud and the prospect that the election process would be rigged against him — reminded that the Democratic nominee had already conceded.

The people have spoken and the election is over, and as Hillary Clinton herself said on election night, in addition to her conceding by congratulating me, ‘We must accept this result and then look to the future,’ he said.

Later Saturday, he tweeted: “The Green Party scam to fill up their coffers by asking for impossible recounts is now being joined by the badly defeated & demoralized Dems”

Kellyanne Conway, Trumps campaign manager, had a sharper edge to her response to the news that the Clinton campaign would join in the Wisconsin recount process.

“What a pack of sore losers. After asking Mr. Trump and his team a million times on the trail, ‘Will HE accept the election results?’ it turns out Team Hillary and her new BFF Jill Stein can’t accept reality,” Conway said in a statement to Bloomberg. “Rather than adhere to the tradition of graciously conceding and wishing the winner well, they’ve opted to waste millions of dollars and dismiss the democratic process. The people have spoken. Time to listen up. #YesYourPresident.”

Stein filed for a recount just before Wisconsin’s 5 p.m. deadline on Friday. She originally promised supporters that if she raised $2.5 million, then the campaign would also file for similar action in Michigan and Pennsylvania.

But based on Donald Trump’s current standing in the Electoral College, Clinton would have to win all three states to overturn the election results.

Elias, the Clinton campaign lawyer, said that participating in the recount was the right step to ensure a fair outcome for all sides but was careful not to get Clinton supporters hopes up too high.

Acknowledging “the heartbreak felt by so many who worked so hard to elect Hillary Clinton,” Elias emphasized that Clinton allies had combed through data and queried experts since President-elect Donald Trump’s upset victory. But it had not found evidence of any hacking of actual votes, and Elias a veteran of many recount fights conceded that Clinton’s deficit even in the closest state, Michigan, “exceeds the largest margin ever overcome in a recount.”

“Regardless of the potential to change the outcome in any of the states, we feel it is important, on principle, to ensure our campaign is legally represented in any court proceedings and represented on the ground in order to monitor the recount process itself,” wrote Elias.

Stein used the opportunity to needle Clinton.

“Why would Hillary Clintonwho conceded the election to Donald Trumpwant #Recount2016? You cannot be on-again, off-again about democracy,” she said in a tweet.

Speculation about potential hacking of several states’ results reached a fever pitch before the holiday weekend, after a New York magazine cited an effort by cyber security experts to convince the Clinton camp that they had found “persuasive evidence” that results in the three states may have been “manipulated or hacked.

On Wednesday, however, J. Alex Halderman of the University of Michigan one of the experts clarified in a Medium post that he was not claiming to have evidence of a hack, but that he still recommends a full audit beyond the partial ones that are likely to occur anyway.

Other accounts also knocked down the idea that electronic voting machines had been tampered with.

The Obama administration said it has seen no evidence of hackers tampering with the presidential election results.

We stand behind our election results, which accurately reflect the will of the American people, a senior administration official told POLITICO late Friday.

The federal government did not observe any increased level of malicious cyber activity aimed at disrupting our electoral process on election day, the official added. We believe our elections were free and fair from a cybersecurity perspective.

In Wisconsin, Trumps margin of victory is just over 22,000 votes.

161126-Barack-Obama-AP_16325844478347.jpg

According to a Friday statement from Michael Haas, an administrator for Wisconsin Election Commission, the recount will begin late next week after the Stein campaign has paid the recount fee. “The state is working under a federal deadline of December 13 to complete the recount,” said the statement. “As a result, county boards of canvassers may need to work evenings and weekends to meet the deadlines.”

Official results from Wisconsin’s 72 counties indicate that 2.975 million votes were cast in the state Trump won 1.404 million votes to Clinton’s 1.382 million.

Clinton leads the president-elect by 2.2 million votes in the popular vote, as of Saturday morning. The former secretary of state has garnered 64,637,140 votes nationally, compared to Trumps 62,408,908, according to a count curated by Dave Wasserman of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.

Some Democrats have argued that Clintons large lead in the popular vote should serve as the impetus for reforming or eliminating the Electoral College system. Several anti-Trump electors have led a longshot effort to convince GOP electors to defect from the president-elect, and an attorney working with them said hes preparing to file suit within two weeks on behalf of Micheal Baca, a Democratic elector from Colorado.

That effort would be part of a coordinated legal fight to dismantle the 29 state laws that force electors to support their partys nominees one of the greatest impediments facing so-called faithless electors.

This story tagged under:

Trump rages as Clinton helps recount

10_donald_trump_2_ap_1160.jpg

“This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing,” Donald Trump said. | AP Photo

Clinton campaign says it will have a presence in the Wisconsin process.

By Brent Griffiths

11/26/16 12:25 PM EST

Updated 11/26/16 05:13 PM EST

Just when you thought it was over, the acrimonious presidential race is back.

Nearly three weeks after Election Day, the Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump campaigns went back into battle mode Saturday in the wake of Wisconsins pending recount.

Story Continued Below

After a period of public silence about the results of the 2016 election, Clinton’s top campaign lawyer said the campaign will play a role in the recount initiated Friday by Green Party candidate Jill Stein. It will follow the same approach in Michigan and Pennsylvania if the third-party hopeful pursues recounts in those states as she has indicated.

“Because we had not uncovered any actionable evidence of hacking or outside attempts to alter the voting technology, we had not planned to exercise this option ourselves, but now that a recount has been initiated in Wisconsin, we intend to participate in order to ensure the process proceeds in a manner that is fair to all sides,” Marc Elias, Clinton’s general counsel, wrote Saturday on Medium.

Trump delivered a measured response measured by his standards attacking Stein directly but refraining from criticizing Clinton.

10_donald_trump_21_gty_1160.jpg

This recount is just a way for Jill Stein, who received less than one percent of the vote overall and wasnt even on the ballot in many states, to fill her coffers with money, most of which she will never even spend on this ridiculous recount, Trump said in a statement released by his transition team. “This is a scam by the Green Party for an election that has already been conceded, and the results of this election should be respected instead of being challenged and abused, which is exactly what Jill Stein is doing.”

In his only mention of Clinton, the president-elect — who frequently raised questions during the campaign about voter fraud and the prospect that the election process would be rigged against him — reminded that the Democratic nominee had already conceded.

The people have spoken and the election is over, and as Hillary Clinton herself said on election night, in addition to her conceding by congratulating me, ‘We must accept this result and then look to the future,’ he said.

Later Saturday, he tweeted: “The Green Party scam to fill up their coffers by asking for impossible recounts is now being joined by the badly defeated & demoralized Dems”

Kellyanne Conway, Trumps campaign manager, had a sharper edge to her response to the news that the Clinton campaign would join in the Wisconsin recount process.

“What a pack of sore losers. After asking Mr. Trump and his team a million times on the trail, ‘Will HE accept the election results?’ it turns out Team Hillary and her new BFF Jill Stein can’t accept reality,” Conway said in a statement to Bloomberg. “Rather than adhere to the tradition of graciously conceding and wishing the winner well, they’ve opted to waste millions of dollars and dismiss the democratic process. The people have spoken. Time to listen up. #YesYourPresident.”

Stein filed for a recount just before Wisconsin’s 5 p.m. deadline on Friday. She originally promised supporters that if she raised $2.5 million, then the campaign would also file for similar action in Michigan and Pennsylvania.

But based on Donald Trump’s current standing in the Electoral College, Clinton would have to win all three states to overturn the election results.

Elias, the Clinton campaign lawyer, said that participating in the recount was the right step to ensure a fair outcome for all sides but was careful not to get Clinton supporters hopes up too high.

Acknowledging “the heartbreak felt by so many who worked so hard to elect Hillary Clinton,” Elias emphasized that Clinton allies had combed through data and queried experts since President-elect Donald Trump’s upset victory. But it had not found evidence of any hacking of actual votes, and Elias a veteran of many recount fights conceded that Clinton’s deficit even in the closest state, Michigan, “exceeds the largest margin ever overcome in a recount.”

“Regardless of the potential to change the outcome in any of the states, we feel it is important, on principle, to ensure our campaign is legally represented in any court proceedings and represented on the ground in order to monitor the recount process itself,” wrote Elias.

Stein used the opportunity to needle Clinton.

“Why would Hillary Clintonwho conceded the election to Donald Trumpwant #Recount2016? You cannot be on-again, off-again about democracy,” she said in a tweet.

Speculation about potential hacking of several states’ results reached a fever pitch before the holiday weekend, after a New York magazine cited an effort by cyber security experts to convince the Clinton camp that they had found “persuasive evidence” that results in the three states may have been “manipulated or hacked.

On Wednesday, however, J. Alex Halderman of the University of Michigan one of the experts clarified in a Medium post that he was not claiming to have evidence of a hack, but that he still recommends a full audit beyond the partial ones that are likely to occur anyway.

Other accounts also knocked down the idea that electronic voting machines had been tampered with.

The Obama administration said it has seen no evidence of hackers tampering with the presidential election results.

We stand behind our election results, which accurately reflect the will of the American people, a senior administration official told POLITICO late Friday.

The federal government did not observe any increased level of malicious cyber activity aimed at disrupting our electoral process on election day, the official added. We believe our elections were free and fair from a cybersecurity perspective.

In Wisconsin, Trumps margin of victory is just over 22,000 votes.

161126-Barack-Obama-AP_16325844478347.jpg

According to a Friday statement from Michael Haas, an administrator for Wisconsin Election Commission, the recount will begin late next week after the Stein campaign has paid the recount fee. “The state is working under a federal deadline of December 13 to complete the recount,” said the statement. “As a result, county boards of canvassers may need to work evenings and weekends to meet the deadlines.”

Official results from Wisconsin’s 72 counties indicate that 2.975 million votes were cast in the state Trump won 1.404 million votes to Clinton’s 1.382 million.

Clinton leads the president-elect by 2.2 million votes in the popular vote, as of Saturday morning. The former secretary of state has garnered 64,637,140 votes nationally, compared to Trumps 62,408,908, according to a count curated by Dave Wasserman of the nonpartisan Cook Political Report.

Some Democrats have argued that Clintons large lead in the popular vote should serve as the impetus for reforming or eliminating the Electoral College system. Several anti-Trump electors have led a longshot effort to convince GOP electors to defect from the president-elect, and an attorney working with them said hes preparing to file suit within two weeks on behalf of Micheal Baca, a Democratic elector from Colorado.

That effort would be part of a coordinated legal fight to dismantle the 29 state laws that force electors to support their partys nominees one of the greatest impediments facing so-called faithless electors.

This story tagged under:

Inside the Final Hours of Debate Prep for Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump

One goes big on policy. The other focuses on sound bites + READ ARTICLE

After more than a year of wall-to-wall campaigning, the outcome of the 2016 election could hinge on 90 unpredictable minutes Monday night in Hempstead, N.Y.

The first presidential debate between Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump is expected to be the most watched in history, with perhaps 100 million viewers tuning in for a showdown with the power to upend an increasingly close race. Given the reach of social media, every mistake or charged moment at Hofstra University will be amplified for the remaining five weeks before Election Day.

The clash comes at a crucial moment for Clinton. The Democrats summer lead has dwindled in recent weeks amid fresh scrutiny of her private email server, a bout with pneumonia and more disciplined performances by her opponent. Polling averages now show Clinton with a narrow national advantage. Surveys of crucial battleground states including Ohio, Florida, Nevada and North Carolina are within the margin of error, while Trump has pulled ahead in Iowa and shaved Clintons cushion in Virginia, Michigan and Wisconsin.

Read More: Donald Trump Called Debate Moderator Lester Holt a Democrat. Hes Actually a Republican.

Clinton still boasts far more paths to the required 270 electoral votes. She enjoys an advantage in on-the-ground organizing in battleground states and a virtual monopoly over the airwaves. But her campaigns failure to put Trump away has Democrats fretting. Trump is a canny media manipulator, and Monday night on Long Island offers him the best forum this fall to channel his celebrity into political credibility by projecting a presidential bearing, just as early voting gets under way.

Despite radically different approaches, both candidates have proved to be formidable opponents. A veteran debater, Clinton is known for preparation, precision and a firm grasp of policy. She often got the better of Barack Obama during their 2008 primaries, and muscle memory helped get her back into fighting condition during her many clashes against Vermont Senator Bernie Sanders this year.

Trump, on the other hand, is the ultimate wildcard. His performances during the Republican debates this year were effectively erratic, peppered with personal insults, flamboyant boasts and often flat-out falsehoods. Once, he was even a no-show. Its an approach his GOP opponents often found hard to counter, and part of the challenge was the mystery of which Trump would show up. Sometimes he slung mud; sometimes he tried to float above the fray. His stumbles did little to dissuade his fervent supporters.

It would be hard to conjure a contest between two more dissimilar candidates. Clinton is most comfortable with nitty-gritty policy; Trump used his time onstage during a debate in Detroit to talk about the size of his penis. Clintons instinct is to turn questions into explanations of why her policies would help voters, while Trump prefers to brag in the first person.

The stylistic contrasts extend to their preparation. Clinton has solicited voluminous advice from her sprawling network of advisers and allies. She asks aides to print for her the best answers and insert them into a series of subject-specific binders, which are often spread across the kitchen counter that doubles as her desk these days, or an actual desk that one aide joked grows in size to accommodate the accumulating memos. Trump will entertain suggestions from his insular circle of advisers aboard his personal jet as he soars to campaign rallies. Clinton wants specifics and details; Trump wants one-liners that will be catnip for cable television.

The 90-minute contest, moderated by NBC News Lester Holt, will feature six 15-minute segments on subjects such as Americas Direction, Achieving Prosperity and Securing America. The vague parameters offer the candidates ample opportunity to steer the conversation toward preferred terrain, whether its Clintons emphasis on lifting women and children or Trumps promise to build a border wall.

One challenge for Clinton is higher expectations. Some advisers are telegraphing that she will, as ever, be the overly prepared technocrat who can tick through detailed specifics on everything from tax policy to Tel Aviv airport access for American airliners. Others caution that Clinton is a by-the-book candidate who thinks everyone on the debate stage rival and moderator alike should heed the prearranged rules. Deviation there could put her off her game, and complaining about it later carries risks: aides dont want the first female nominee of a major party to get branded as a whiner. Its one thing to interrupt a Foreign Minister on policy disagreements in private and another to cut off a political rival in public even if he veers outside the parameters of established fact or social norms.

Then there is the Republican. Clintons team and Trumps boosters are equally unsure which version of the billionaire will show up: the braggart or the businessman? Clinton is preparing for both, although her top advisers worry the split-track preparations have left each option under-explored. The leading advice is to have Clinton behave the same way regardless, with just one or two prepackaged retorts at the ready for each of Trumps possible provocations. She has to be herself, one adviser who is not in the room with Clinton says. She already has the honest-and-trustworthy problem without showing up as someone she isnt. Shes a nerd. She has to own that.

Even Trumps supporters are nervous about his scattershot preparations. Debates are among the most important moments of the fall campaign. Trump was able to skate through his primary debates by wielding snark and snide asides as a weapon on crowded stages. One-on-one contests are different. Eschewing the customary mock debates to prepare, Trump is more comfortable chewing over ideas with aides on his plane and at his houses. Instead of veteran Republican debate hands, his pre-debate powwows are filled with former Breitbart executives, family members and elected officials with whom the candidate is close.

Presidential debates have a baked-in power that no other moments in the campaign can match. A strong performance before a vast audience including many voters tuning in to watch the candidates for the first time can turn the tide of the race. In 2012, Republican nominee Mitt Romney clawed back into the contest with a forceful showing in the first debate against Obama, boosting his poll numbers and infusing his flagging campaign with fresh momentum and money.

But Americans minds are largely made up this year. Voters seem to be watching two totally disconnected, unrelated campaigns play out in partisan media and self-selected social-media accounts. Thats why many observers believe Monday nights television the Super Bowl of campaign 2016 will be an emotional event and not an intellectual one. In a contest featuring the two least-beloved major-party nominees in modern times, each candidate will have to nurture a connection with the audience that will endure through Election Day.

Japanese Emperor Akihito ‘wishes to abdicate’ – BBC News

Japan's Emperor Akihito declares the opening of the ordinary session of parliament in Tokyo, Japan on 4 January 2016Image copyright Reuters Image caption Emperor Akihito succeeded his father, Hirohito, in 1989 Japan’s Emperor Akihito has expressed his desire to abdicate in the next few years, public broadcaster NHK reports.

The 82-year-old, who has had health problems in recent years, reportedly does not wish to remain emperor if he has to reduce his official duties.

But a palace spokesman denied that there is any official plan for the monarch to abdicate in what would be an unprecedented move in modern Japan.

Crown Prince Naruhito, 56, is next in line to the Chrysanthemum Throne.

An unnamed government source told Japan’s Kyodo news agency that the emperor, who plays a largely ceremonial role but is respected deeply by many Japanese, has been contemplating the move for about a year.

His family had accepted his decision, an unnamed palace source told NHK.

However, both palace and government sources say the Imperial Household Law would have to revised to allow for the abdication to take place.

A change to the Imperial Household Law, which stipulates the rules of succession, would require approval by Japan’s parliament.

Despite a categorical denial of the reports by imperial palace spokesman Shinichiro Yamamoto, the emperor’s reported wishes are being given prominent attention in the Japanese media.

Emperor Akihito, who had been on the throne for 27 years, has been admired for distancing the monarchy from its association with the aggressive nationalism of World War Two.

The BBC’s Steve Evans in the capital, Tokyo, says Akihito would be the first Japanese emperor to abdicate in 200 years.

Our correspondent says in 1989 he succeeded his father, Hirohito, who had had the status of a living god in Japan until he was stripped of that role by the victorious Americans who wrote the country’s post-war constitution.

Image copyright AFP Image caption Emperor Akihito’s coronation was in 1990

Emperor Akihito had surgery for prostate cancer in 2003 and a heart bypass operation four years ago.

In 2011, he took the highly unusual step of making a televised national address following the devastating earthquake and tsunami at Fukushima.

This was a revolutionary gesture in a country unused to even hearing or seeing emperors, our correspondent says.

Five things about Japan’s emperor:

Image copyright AFP Has adopted a more modern style, making efforts to draw the imperial family closer to the peopleHe married a commoner in 1959 – their love story captured the nation and was dubbed the “tennis court romance” as they met over the nets. Together he and Empress Michiko have three childrenHas sought to heal the scars of WWII, saying last year: “Looking back at the past, together with deep remorse over the war, I pray that this tragedy of war will not be repeated and together with the people express my deep condolences for those who fell in battle and in the ravages of war.”Acknowledged his Korean ancestry in the run-up to the 2002 World Cup, which Japan and South Korea jointly hosted. This surprised many in Japan given the country’s bitter colonial legacy on the Korean peninsulaHis passion is marine biology and he is an expert on the goby fish.